30 March 2011

Topeka-upon-Kansas

Bill James is the godfather of sabermetrics, the broad term for using advanced metrics and statistics when analyzing a baseball player's ability. Slate has an excerpt from his new book, Solid Fool's Good. In the piece, Bill looks at how good our culture is at developing athletes and how crappy it is at developing writers.

The population of Topeka, Kan., today is roughly the same as the population of London in the time of Shakespeare, and the population of Kansas now is not that much lower than the population of England at that time. London at the time of Shakespeare had not only Shakespeare—whoever he was—but also Christopher Mar­lowe, Francis Bacon, Ben Jonson, and various other men of letters who are still read today. I doubt that Topeka today has quite the same collection of distinguished writers.

...The average city the size of Topeka produces a major league player every 10 or 15 years. If we did the same things for young writers, every city would produce a Shakespeare or a Dickens or at least a Graham Greene every 10 or 15 years. Instead, we tell the young writers that they should work on their craft for 20 or 25 years, get to be really, really good—among the best in the world—and then we'll give them a little bit of recognition.

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